Monthly Archives: October 2014

Research Proposal #seaccr

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Research Proposal: Student Behavior Responses to CHAMP
Meagan Mickelson
University of Alaska Southeast

Student Behavior Response to CHAMP
Introduction
My class this year consists of 14 boys and 10 girls with many behavior problems. Teaching and managing the class has been difficult from the beginning of the year. Students are struggling with talking out of turn and other constant disruptions. The disruptive behavior is hampering students’ ability to learn and my ability to teach. I have been spending most of the year trying to come up with new ideas to reduce this disruptive behavior.

Thematic Literature Review
Classroom management is the foundation for student learning and effective teaching. It is essential that teachers have or develop efficient classroom management skills. In my review of literature, I have found some important themes that are visible. These themes include: establishing those rules and procedures, monitoring and adjusting, having clear consequences, and the classroom environment.
Establishing and teaching rules and procedures in your classroom is the foundation for learning and classroom management. “Establishing expectations includes identifying and defining a small number of positively stated expectations, or rules, that are broad enough to include all desired behavior and are mutually exclusive. The identified expectations are posted and are explicitly and systematically taught to students” (Simonsen et. al., 2008, p.358). These statements sum up the importance of having and teaching clear rules and expectations. Teachers should start their year out with a set of expectations for behavior (Odom-LaCaze, McCormick, & Meyer, 2012, p. 1). It is not possible for teachers to instruct or for students to be productive if there are no guidelines for behavior (Marzano, 2003). Teachers need to have rules and procedures in place at the beginning of the year and teach them effectively.
Once rules and procedures have been set in place, teachers need to monitor student behaviors and what is working in their class and with their group of students. Monitoring refers to checking the effectiveness of school policies on discipline and pastoral care (Smith & Laslett, 1993). We need to be sure that our classroom policies match school policies and that we are monitoring them and being supported by administration. Monitoring could include signals in the classroom such as a finder to the lips, headshake, or eye contact until the student complies with the behavioral expectation (Bala). If students have learned the expectations and rules sometimes simple cues could get them back on task. Monitoring and adjusting are essential to making your behavior plan effective throughout the year.
Teachers’ response to inappropriate behavior is essential to management plan. Some consequences might include: brief, contingent, and specific error corrections, performance feedback, differential reinforcement, planned ignoring, response cost, and time out from reinforcement (Simonsen et. al., 2008, p.364). Sometimes one response works for the whole class other times you need to differentiate responses. Consequences should be posted and not only should students understand the rules but they need to understand the consequences as well, it improves cooperation and achievement among students (Odom-LaCaze, McCormick, & Meyer, 2012, p. 3). At times, we establish rules and teach them but forget about teaching the consequences.
The set up and classroom environment effect classroom management. “Structure refers to the amount of teacher or adult-directed activity, the extent to which routines are explicitly defined, and the design or physical arrangement of the classroom” (Simonsen et. al., 2008, p.353). Physical arrangement and instruction play a vital role in behaviors of students. According to a study by Worseham (2006) there are four keys to good room arrangement including: keeping high traffic areas free of congestion, be sure students can easily see the teacher, frequently used materials and supplies are accessible to students, and have small groups (Bala). In setting up your room or adjusting your room arrangement, these are important to keep in mind.
Classroom management is at the heart of teaching and learning. If we don’t have well managed classes, instruction time is lost and you are not being an effective teacher. In research, there are 4 key ideas that came up and those include: establishing rules and procedures, monitoring, teacher’s response to behavior, and physical environment of the classroom.

Framework and Justification
Many of my 2nd grade students are constantly disrupting instruction and independent work time. The key variables to this issue could include: lack of support at home, ADHD, boredom, need for attention, disruptive behavior disorder, poverty, abuse and neglect, harsh and inconsistent parenting, drug and alcohol use by caregiver, emotional and physical or sexual abuse, modeling of aggression, media violence, negative attitude toward school, family transitions, or parent criminality (Johnston, 2013). The literature reviewed revealed that rules and expectations need to be in place and monitored, and teacher’s response to behavior is important. The focus of my research is on using specific, positive behavior statements to reduce the disruptive behavior.

Research Question
The purpose of this case study will be to use specific positive behavioral statements before each activity in order to reduce disruptive behavior for 2nd graders at East Elementary. At this stage in the research, the disruptive behaviors will be defined as behaviors the hamper the ability of instructors to teach students to learn.

Method
I am currently teaching 2nd grade, this is my first year with such a large class of 24 students. I have been struggling with many behavior problems in the classroom. Much of my instruction time is being consumed by dealing with behavior problems. One of the most notable problems in the class is that I have several students who are constantly talking and I have not found anything that works to keep them quiet. The goal of this study is to see if implementing CHAMP (conversation, help, activity, movement, and participation) statements before each major subject including: writing, math, and reading will reduce the amount of disruptions in my class.

Participants
The participants are my 24 2nd grade students. There are 14 boys and 10 girls in the class. The focus will be on 3 boys who have the most disruptive behavior in the class.
Materials
I will be using an observation sheet to record and collecting data using tally marks. The data sheet will be on a clipboard and collected throughout the day. The interview sheet will also be used in collecting data throughout the study.

Procedure
In this study, I will be using CHAMP statements before math, reading, and writing each day to determine if the statements will reduce disruptive behavior in the classroom. Disruptive behavior in this study is defined as talking out of turn, getting up and moving around out of their seat, and talking to their neighbor. I will observe 3 of my most disruptive students during reading, writing, and math to collect tally marks on the occurrences of those behaviors.
Qualitative data for this study will be collected by interviewing those students to determine if they think that CHAMP is helping them regulate their disruptive behavior. I will also be interviewing aides in my classroom to determine whether they have noticed a difference in student behavior. These interviews will be conducted after a week of implementation of CHAMP.

References:
Bala, E. (n.d.). Improving Classroom Instructions: Through Effective Classroom
Management Approach in Nigeria Basic Education System. Department of
Educational Foundations and Management, Federal College of Education,
P.M.B 3473.
Johnston, H. (2013, January 1). Disruptive Behavior: School Based
Interventions. Retrieved October 9, 2014.
Marzano, R., & Marzano, J. (2003). Rules and Procedures. In Classroom management
that works research-based strategies for every teacher. Alexandria, Va:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
Odom LaCaze, D., McCormick, C., & Meyer, L. (2012). Classroom Behavior and
Management for Teachers. National Forum of Teacher Education Journal, 22(3).
Simonsen, B., Fairbanks, S., Briesch, A., Meyers, D., & Sugai, G. (2008). Evidence-
based practices in classroom managememt: Considerations for research
practice. Education and Treatment of Children, 31(3), 351-380.
Smith, C., & Laslett, R. (1993). Chaper 1: Four Rules of Classroom Management. In
Effective classroom management a teacher’s guide (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.

Week 7 response #seaccr

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This week I was able to spend some time reviewing other projects and ideas for data collection. It sounds like others have some great projects going on. I was was able to comment and offer a few suggestions on some of the projects. I have a project that is similar to another student in the class so I was able to exchange ideas. This week also gave me some time to reflect on my own data collection and what I might be missing or not thinking about.

I am looking forward to learning more about other projects and being able to contribute ideas. I am hoping others will look into CHAMP for setting expectations in their class. I am also hoping that I can share more about how CHAMP works in my class.

Research Plan #seaccr

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Research Design

I am currently teaching 2nd grade, this is my first year with such a large class of 24 students. I have been struggling with many behavior problems in the classroom. Much of my instruction time is being consumed by dealing with behavior problems. One of the most notable problems in the class is that I have several students who are constantly talking and I have not found anything that works to keep them quiet. The goal of this study to see if implementing CHAMP (conversation, help, activity, movement, and participation) statements before each major subject including: writing, math, and reading will reduce the amount of disruptions in my class.

Participants

The participants are my 24 2nd grade students. There are 14 boys and 10 girls in the class. The focus will be on 3 boys who have the most disruptive behavior in the class.

Materials

I will be using an observation sheet to record and just collecting data using tally marks. The data sheet will be on a clipboard and collected throughout the day. The interview sheet will also be used in collecting data.

Procedure

In this study, I will be using CHAMP statements before math, reading, and writing each day to determine if the statements will reduce disruptive behavior in the classroom. Disruptive behavior in this study is defined as talking out of turn, getting up and moving around out of their seat, and talking to their neighbor. I will observe 3 of my most disruptive students during reading, writing, and math to collect tally marks on the occurrences of those behaviors.

Qualitative data for this study will be collected by interviewing those students to determine if they think that CHAMP is helping them regulate their disruptive behavior. I will also be interviewing aides in my classroom to determine whether they have noticed a difference in student behavior. These interviews will be conducted after a week of implementation of CHAMP.

Week 6 Response #seaccr

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This week, I was able to contribute to others learning by posting my ideas about data and asking for feedback and new ideas. A few students posted and helped me think through my ideas for collection data. This contributed to their learning by allowing them to think about their data more and then share ideas with me. I also was able to read several blogs and get some ideas for my research and data collection.

#seaccr Week 6 Blog

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After researching various ways to collect data, I have come up with the idea of just using quick tally marks to record occurrences of disruptive behavior. After jotting these down, I will use a spreadsheet to record the data on. The challenges I am anticipating are being able to be consistent with my data collection and how my data will look when my very disruptive behavior students are absent. I am still working out the details so any feedback and help on this would be greatly appreciated.

Week 5 Response #seaccr

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This week I was able to review how others were planning to collect their data as well as share my methods. I was also able to use social media to help me generate my framework and research question. It was very helpful to look at other students’ work and interact with them to help my project.

Many students are focusing on some aspect of classroom management so I was able to find information as well as share information on that subject in my blog. I posted my ideas for collecting data and I hope it was helpful for others to read.

I used social media to help me modify my research question and framework. I was able to look at various examples and read other students’ blogs in order to help me with my project.

Research Question and Framework

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Research Question:

The purpose of this case study will be to use specific positive behavioral statements before each activity in order to reduce disruptive behavior for 2nd graders at East Elementary. At this stage in the research, the disruptive behaviors will be defined as behaviors the hamper the ability of instructors to teach students to learn.

Theoretical Framework:

Many of my 2nd grade students are constantly disrupting instruction and independent work time. The key variables to this issue could include: lack of support at home, ADHD, boredom, need for attention, disruptive behavior disorder, poverty, abuse and neglect, harsh and inconsistent parenting, drug and alcohol use by caregiver, emotional and physical or sexual abuse, modeling of aggression, media violence, negative attitude toward school, family transitions, or parent criminality (Johnston, 2013). The literature reviewed revealed that rules and expectations need to be in place and monitored, and teacher’s response to behavior is important. The focus of my research will be specifically on using clear and positive behavior statements to reduce the disruptive behavior.

References
Johnston, H. (2013, January 1). Disruptive Behavior: School Based
Interventions. Retrieved October 9, 2014.

Week 5 Blog #seaccr

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There are many methods for collecting data in the classroom. Some of the methods that I have researched will work for my data collection; others may not work so well. As teachers, we are constantly collecting data about our individual students and about our classroom. There are many different ways to collect data in the classroom.

In some of the research I have read, various data collection methods are described. Observations and experiences could be one way to collect data. Collection of research to back your data is another method that I have come across. Other methods include documenting frequency of particular behaviors or activitiess, you could look at behaviors in a specific time frame, and recording duration. The data can be collected in scatter plots, tables, or with tally marks.

For my research, I will need to design a method for data collection. With the nature of my study, I will most likely be using tally marks to collect data because it will be during instruction throughout the day. I will create a table where I can collect tally marks throughout the day.

Week 4 Response #seaccr

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I enjoyed reading and responding to blogs this week. I found that it really helped inform my research and I was able to learn about different topics that others were researching.

In reading and responding to blogs that were around the same topic as mine, I was able to get new ideas and share my ideas with them. I also found research that is similar to my topic and my research has informed others doing similar research. In reading other students’ research, I was able to begin thinking about my research question and framework.

I have found that students researching different topics have very interesting ideas and I was able to share with them from experience. I was able to bounce ideas about writing with younger children. Also, the topic of grouping came up and I was able to share my ideas for pairing learning partners and grouping students as well as read research that a classmate had done.